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Laser eye ops could ruin sight

LasikOne of the most common physical ailments that people suffer from is poor vision. The eye is a complicated organ that requires a very exact arrangement of components to function properly. If even one of these components is not precisely the correct shape, then light that falls on the eye will not be focused correctly.

For centuries, people have relied on external lenses to alter the angle of the light entering the eye. Whether in glasses or contact lenses, these appliances have proven invaluable in the correction of poor vision. While external lenses will remain popular for the foreseeable future, advances in technology have made it possible for surgeons to alter the shape of the eye itself.

However, concern has been raised about the long-term effects of laser eye surgery after a new study has shown that tens of thousands of Kiwis are likely to suffer defective vision from the surgery in their later years.

Studies from Otago and Oxford Universities have shown that laser surgery for short-sightedness could cause haze, glare and blurred vision as people reach their 60s and 70s.

Laser eye surgery may have its risks but for most people it brings huge relief.

Katie Stow, a public relations consultant, had laser surgery eight months ago and she's delighted with the results. From being nearly blind, she now has almost perfect eyesight.

"It was really good and my eyesight is pretty much perfect."

The only problem she has had is to do with night vision.

"My night vision looking at lights, there's a bit of a halo around it. But it's definitely deal-with-able."

Stow said her surgeons were helpful and she had confidence in them.

"They went though all the risks involved. They were pretty cautious about the whole thing. I was thinking, 'just do it'."

And when she was told of the new research saying she may have problems in the future she wasn't unduly worried.

"Anything is better than what I had before. I might be concerned about that if my eyesight was bad.

"But having the next 30 years of proper eyesight is fine for me."

Link: NZ Herald
Image: LasikSucks4U
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